Vine Vera on Painting with Your Kids – VineVera Reviews

Young girl with various color paints smeared on her hands making a heart shape with her fingersTeaching your kids painting can be a fun activity for both you and your child. All it requires are a few cheap and easy to find materials, a lot of love and time. Painting helps your children to grow faster by giving them with a platform to express themselves. Painting is also seen as an extremely effective means of representing emotions and feelings that have been bottled up deep inside. Each child is more than likely to have his or her own way and style of painting, and you should learn to honor and encourage that as a parent. Remember, when it comes to painting with your kids, it is important to allow them to experiment with various mediums. This helps you open up a brand new world of possibilities for your kids, enjoy yourself to the fullest and spend some quality time with your child. This post from Vine Vera helps you gather a few useful insights about painting with your kids.

 

Painting with Preschool kids

Preschool kids are at an age when they can just begin to learn how to paint. Seat your child in his/ her high chair and give him/ her a sheet and some finger paint. Try to demonstrate the art of painting to your kids and chances are that they should become enthralled with it pretty soon. Remember, start off with single colors and increase their palette as they get a hang of painting. Preschool kids should be easily able to change colors and try to create recognizable images after they get a hang of painting. They are also more than likely to enjoy the art of painting as well.

 

Things to Remember

  1. Limit your remarks and encourage your child irrespective of how the painting looks.
  2. Allow your child to use certain colors and follow his/ her own style.
  3. Wide brushes always work best for younger kids.
  4. Post your child’s work of art on the refrigerator or frame it on a wall. This is likely to inspire them to paint more. They also make for great gifts.

 

Painting with K – 3rd Grade kids

At this age, the child is more than likely to have a better control over the strokes, brushes and other applications. This is an ideal time to allow your child to experiment different brush strokes and encourage them to add greater detail into their creations. Make sure that you give your child the requisite artistic freedom and by offering all sorts of art materials. Add fun items like cut potatoes, pine cones, rags, toothbrushes and twigs into the picture as well. Again, it is equally important to encourage your child’s work and remain neutral when responding to the painting. Try not to influence your child’s style and make sure that you don’t shower your child with too much praise or too many suggestions.

 

Painting with 4th – 6th Grade kids

If your child is really into painting, it should begin to show by now. On the other hand, if your child hasn’t had too much experience with painting before, now would be the ideal time to introduce it as well. Your child has a larger emotional and mental backup to withdraw information from and you can often find their art reflecting their passions or experiences. It also makes sense to invest in sturdier tools, a better quality of water paper, different techniques and things like oil paints or acrylic paints. These things might be a bit pricey, but if your child is into painting, they are well worth the investment. You also need to remember that kids in this age group should be open to constructive criticism. But, you need to make sure that you wait until you’re asked.

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